Erin Mallon On Her Unexpectedly Busy Summer

Career Dispatches

Erin Mallon On Her Unexpectedly Busy Summer

By Erin Mallon

August 4, 2012


Erin Mallon
The universe must have read my last dispatch about the slower pace of summer and wanted to prove me wrong, because suddenly things are anything but slow, and in the best possible way.

Next week we begin workshop showings of "Untitled Play About Brecht's Girlfriends & Boyfriend & Wife" (Aug. 9-12 and 15-18, 8 p.m., thebrechtplay@gmail.com). I'm quite proud of what we've created and excited to see where we take it next.

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is presenting my 10-minute play, "Good Working With Hands," Aug. 10 as part of its In Process performance series. I wrote it during one of the Brooklyn Generator's creativity-inducing weekends. I adore the work they do at HVSF, and I'm encouraged by all the great things happening to our Brooklyn Generator participants as a result of our 48-hour adventures in play-making. (To find out about future gatherings, "like" us on Facebook at the Brooklyn Generator.)

I'm spending loads of time in the recording booth this month and loving every second. I'm prepping to record a sweet young-adult audio book and am in the throes of narrating a British erotica title (say whaaat?). This is an oddly glorious experience, I have to say. I get to exercise all sorts of dialects (standard British, cockney, French, Scottish) while weaving a hilarious fictional tale of a bevy of sexually repressed (yet wildly libidinous) Brits in the early 1800s.

I'm happily recognizing this month that my life and career are flowing in a direction I really like. It wasn't always this way. Ever read "The Alchemist"? Here's one of my favorite takeaways from that amazing book: "When each day is the same as the next, it's because people fail to recognize the good things that happen in their lives every day that the sun rises."

I didn't understand this when I was first out of school. I didn't understand that you simply have to do the best possible work you can with what's in front of you and then build on (and celebrate) your successes. Each small success is enough to light a steadier fire in you. That fire keeps sparking you to take the next step, and then the next, until suddenly you feel like the whole world is warming to you and conspiring in your favor.

I get it now. And it's delicious stuff.

www.erinmallon.net.


Erin Mallon On Her Unexpectedly Busy Summer

By Erin Mallon

August 4, 2012


Erin Mallon
The universe must have read my last dispatch about the slower pace of summer and wanted to prove me wrong, because suddenly things are anything but slow, and in the best possible way.

Next week we begin workshop showings of "Untitled Play About Brecht's Girlfriends & Boyfriend & Wife" (Aug. 9-12 and 15-18, 8 p.m., thebrechtplay@gmail.com). I'm quite proud of what we've created and excited to see where we take it next.

Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival is presenting my 10-minute play, "Good Working With Hands," Aug. 10 as part of its In Process performance series. I wrote it during one of the Brooklyn Generator's creativity-inducing weekends. I adore the work they do at HVSF, and I'm encouraged by all the great things happening to our Brooklyn Generator participants as a result of our 48-hour adventures in play-making. (To find out about future gatherings, "like" us on Facebook at the Brooklyn Generator.)

I'm spending loads of time in the recording booth this month and loving every second. I'm prepping to record a sweet young-adult audio book and am in the throes of narrating a British erotica title (say whaaat?). This is an oddly glorious experience, I have to say. I get to exercise all sorts of dialects (standard British, cockney, French, Scottish) while weaving a hilarious fictional tale of a bevy of sexually repressed (yet wildly libidinous) Brits in the early 1800s.

I'm happily recognizing this month that my life and career are flowing in a direction I really like. It wasn't always this way. Ever read "The Alchemist"? Here's one of my favorite takeaways from that amazing book: "When each day is the same as the next, it's because people fail to recognize the good things that happen in their lives every day that the sun rises."

I didn't understand this when I was first out of school. I didn't understand that you simply have to do the best possible work you can with what's in front of you and then build on (and celebrate) your successes. Each small success is enough to light a steadier fire in you. That fire keeps sparking you to take the next step, and then the next, until suddenly you feel like the whole world is warming to you and conspiring in your favor.

I get it now. And it's delicious stuff.

www.erinmallon.net.
 
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