MPAA Praises Google's Anti-Piracy Move

MPAA Praises Google's Anti-Piracy Move

By Sean J. Miller

August 13, 2012


Hollywood may yet find an ally in Google in its fight against copyright infringement.

Google announced Aug. 10 that it will take into account the number of valid copyright removal notices it receives about a site when ranking its search results.

"Sites with high numbers of removal notices may appear lower in our results," Amit Singhal, a Google senior vice president, wrote on the company's blog. "This ranking change should help users find legitimate, quality sources of content more easily—whether it’s a song previewed on NPR's music website, a TV show on Hulu, or new music streamed from Spotify."

Entertainment industry trade groups praised the move. “We are optimistic that Google’s actions will help steer consumers to the myriad legitimate ways for them to access movies and TV shows online, and away from the rogue cyberlockers, peer-to-peer sites, and other outlaw enterprises that steal the hard work of creators across the globe," Michael O’Leary, a spokesman for the Motion Picture Association of America, said in statement. “We will be watching this development closely—the devil is always in the details—and look forward to Google taking further steps to ensure that its services favor legitimate businesses and creators, not thieves.”

Google said it has paid increasing attention to copyright removal notices for the past two years. Singhal notes the search provider is now processing more copyright removal notices each day than it did in all of 2009—"More than 4.3 million URLs in the last 30 days alone," he wrote. But until last Friday, that data hadn't been incorporated in search results.

That led some prominent members of the entertainment industry earlier this year to accuse Google of facilitating piracy. “If they don’t stop the stealing of content I think it is going to be a problem," Ari Emanuel, co-CEO of WME, told the AllThingsD conference in May.

Google's statement didn't include specific mention of YouTube, its site that frequently hosts user-submitted material in violation of copyright. Singhal wrote: "Google cannot determine whether a particular webpage does or does not violate copyright law. So while this new signal will influence the ranking of some search results, we won’t be removing any pages from search results unless we receive a valid copyright removal notice from the rights owner.


MPAA Praises Google's Anti-Piracy Move

By Sean J. Miller

August 13, 2012


Hollywood may yet find an ally in Google in its fight against copyright infringement.

Google announced Aug. 10 that it will take into account the number of valid copyright removal notices it receives about a site when ranking its search results.

"Sites with high numbers of removal notices may appear lower in our results," Amit Singhal, a Google senior vice president, wrote on the company's blog. "This ranking change should help users find legitimate, quality sources of content more easily—whether it’s a song previewed on NPR's music website, a TV show on Hulu, or new music streamed from Spotify."

Entertainment industry trade groups praised the move. “We are optimistic that Google’s actions will help steer consumers to the myriad legitimate ways for them to access movies and TV shows online, and away from the rogue cyberlockers, peer-to-peer sites, and other outlaw enterprises that steal the hard work of creators across the globe," Michael O’Leary, a spokesman for the Motion Picture Association of America, said in statement. “We will be watching this development closely—the devil is always in the details—and look forward to Google taking further steps to ensure that its services favor legitimate businesses and creators, not thieves.”

Google said it has paid increasing attention to copyright removal notices for the past two years. Singhal notes the search provider is now processing more copyright removal notices each day than it did in all of 2009—"More than 4.3 million URLs in the last 30 days alone," he wrote. But until last Friday, that data hadn't been incorporated in search results.

That led some prominent members of the entertainment industry earlier this year to accuse Google of facilitating piracy. “If they don’t stop the stealing of content I think it is going to be a problem," Ari Emanuel, co-CEO of WME, told the AllThingsD conference in May.

Google's statement didn't include specific mention of YouTube, its site that frequently hosts user-submitted material in violation of copyright. Singhal wrote: "Google cannot determine whether a particular webpage does or does not violate copyright law. So while this new signal will influence the ranking of some search results, we won’t be removing any pages from search results unless we receive a valid copyright removal notice from the rights owner.
 
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