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The Wright Stuff: MiT’s executive VP of operations, Bevan Wright

Oct 23, 2013

-By Andreas Fuchs


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1388108-Wright_Md.jpg
 “What is my favorite movie theatre memory? Probably not appropriate for this article.”

In the industry since 1985, Bevan Wright spent ten years as cinema systems product and engineering manager at Christie, directing product development and engineering support for all cinema product lines, managing the lines to develop and bring to market fully integrated solutions for exhibitors. The previous nine years he held engineering and operations positions at Christie, United Artists Theatre Circuit, and with other cinema exhibitors. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University, and holds two patents in cinema projection technology.

Wright’s first job was as a projectionist at Blair Metro Park in Phoenix, Arizona, which later became part of UA Theatre Circuit. “It just got in my blood,” he recalls fondly, even though it has permanently affected his taste buds when going to the movies. “I used to work in the cinemas, so I can no longer eat popcorn. My favorite snacks today are Red Vines and Mountain Dew.” While his favorite film is Pulp Fiction, “seeing the original Star Wars at the Harkins Cine Capri in Phoenix, Arizona, is still etched in my memory banks.”

On the founding team in 2003, Wright tells us that he “wanted to be part of a smaller company where I would have more input and control of the business decisions. I also knew that digital cinema was coming and thought to use the transition as the springboard for a new company.” Whereas “the early years before 3D actually kick-started d-cinema deployment were a bit rocky,” he felt “true validation that what we were doing was ‘best of breed’ when MiT was awarded the large rollout contracts for Cinemark, Cinépolis and Cinemex.” Since then, over 15,000 integrated bases have been shipped, Wright says, and MiT employs almost 50 people and a 250-plus strong customer base.

Listening to every single one of them and “developing innovative solutions for our customers” are the key elements alongside “custom fabrication and integration” that set MiT apart from the competition, Wright has observed over the years. “Customer service, flexibility and responsiveness are the most crucial aspect of operating a cinema technology company."


The Wright Stuff: MiT’s executive VP of operations, Bevan Wright

Oct 23, 2013

-By Andreas Fuchs


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1388108-Wright_Md.jpg

 “What is my favorite movie theatre memory? Probably not appropriate for this article.”

In the industry since 1985, Bevan Wright spent ten years as cinema systems product and engineering manager at Christie, directing product development and engineering support for all cinema product lines, managing the lines to develop and bring to market fully integrated solutions for exhibitors. The previous nine years he held engineering and operations positions at Christie, United Artists Theatre Circuit, and with other cinema exhibitors. He has a Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering from Arizona State University, and holds two patents in cinema projection technology.

Wright’s first job was as a projectionist at Blair Metro Park in Phoenix, Arizona, which later became part of UA Theatre Circuit. “It just got in my blood,” he recalls fondly, even though it has permanently affected his taste buds when going to the movies. “I used to work in the cinemas, so I can no longer eat popcorn. My favorite snacks today are Red Vines and Mountain Dew.” While his favorite film is Pulp Fiction, “seeing the original Star Wars at the Harkins Cine Capri in Phoenix, Arizona, is still etched in my memory banks.”

On the founding team in 2003, Wright tells us that he “wanted to be part of a smaller company where I would have more input and control of the business decisions. I also knew that digital cinema was coming and thought to use the transition as the springboard for a new company.” Whereas “the early years before 3D actually kick-started d-cinema deployment were a bit rocky,” he felt “true validation that what we were doing was ‘best of breed’ when MiT was awarded the large rollout contracts for Cinemark, Cinépolis and Cinemex.” Since then, over 15,000 integrated bases have been shipped, Wright says, and MiT employs almost 50 people and a 250-plus strong customer base.

Listening to every single one of them and “developing innovative solutions for our customers” are the key elements alongside “custom fabrication and integration” that set MiT apart from the competition, Wright has observed over the years. “Customer service, flexibility and responsiveness are the most crucial aspect of operating a cinema technology company."
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