News





Restoration of original 'Godzilla' to premiere in April

Feb 19, 2014

A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations and remakes, will debut on April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released in the U.S. in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, a severely cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98-minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai.

As directed by Ishirô Honda, with special effects by the legendary Eiji Tsuburaya, Godzilla: The Japanese Original is much darker in tone than the dumbed-down U.S. release version, which entirely eliminated the original’s underlying theme: In the Japanese version, the monster is clearly a metaphor for the nuclear menace and the film itself a cry for world peace and disarmament. The American version also cut out all of the original’s Strangelove-like black humor.

Godzilla became Toho Studio’s #1 box office hit of 1954 (its #2 that year was Seven Samurai) and was so popular worldwide that the company has since produced nearly 30 sequels and remakes; a statue near Toho headquarters in Tokyo pays tribute to their most valuable property. In 1984, the prestigious film journal Kinema Junpo rated it among the top 20 Japanese films of all time. In 1989, a published survey of 370 Japanese movie critics, Nihon Eiga Besuto 150 (Best 150 Japanese Films), ranked Godzilla the 27th greatest Japanese feature ever made.

A new American version of Godzilla from Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures, directed by Gareth Edwards (2010’s Monsters), will be released nationally on May 16.


Restoration of original 'Godzilla' to premiere in April

Feb 19, 2014

A new restoration of Godzilla: The Japanese Original, the monster classic that has spawned six decades of sequels, imitations and remakes, will debut on April 12 at the fifth TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood, followed by a national release beginning at New York’s Film Forum, April 18-24.

Godzilla was originally released in the U.S. in 1956 as Godzilla: King of the Monsters, a severely cut, dubbed and re-edited version that inserted American actor Raymond Burr into the action; only an hour was used of the original’s 98-minute running time. Burr does not appear in the original, uncut version, which has an all-Japanese cast including Kurosawa regular Takashi Shimura, who the very same year appeared as leader of the Seven Samurai.

As directed by Ishirô Honda, with special effects by the legendary Eiji Tsuburaya, Godzilla: The Japanese Original is much darker in tone than the dumbed-down U.S. release version, which entirely eliminated the original’s underlying theme: In the Japanese version, the monster is clearly a metaphor for the nuclear menace and the film itself a cry for world peace and disarmament. The American version also cut out all of the original’s Strangelove-like black humor.

Godzilla became Toho Studio’s #1 box office hit of 1954 (its #2 that year was Seven Samurai) and was so popular worldwide that the company has since produced nearly 30 sequels and remakes; a statue near Toho headquarters in Tokyo pays tribute to their most valuable property. In 1984, the prestigious film journal Kinema Junpo rated it among the top 20 Japanese films of all time. In 1989, a published survey of 370 Japanese movie critics, Nihon Eiga Besuto 150 (Best 150 Japanese Films), ranked Godzilla the 27th greatest Japanese feature ever made.

A new American version of Godzilla from Warner Bros. and Legendary Pictures, directed by Gareth Edwards (2010’s Monsters), will be released nationally on May 16.

More Cinemas

NCM's 'FirstLook' is now Shazamable

Shazam and National CineMedia announced the full national rollout of their exclusive deal More »

Seattle Cinerama unveils state-of-the-art renovation

Seattle’s Cinerama has been upgraded with state-of-the-art sight and sound More »

NCM and Screenvision respond to Justice Department action

National CineMedia, Inc. and Screenvision, LLC defended their proposed merger in response to a complaint filed by the U.S. Department of Justice More »

Carmike rolls out Veterans Day promotion

Carmike Cinemas announced a special Veterans Day promotion More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Hunger Games - Mockingjay Pt 1
Film Review: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1

Darker, less action-packed first half of the final installment of the popular franchise moves from arenas to rubble aplenty as Jennifer Lawrence’s super-heroine is called upon to serve her beleaguered and much-destroyed nation as propaganda instrument and leader. Fans of the books and previous two films get a less flashy palette here, but the engaging characters and strong story return to stir interest for the scheduled November 2015 finale. More »

Foxcatcher review
Film Review: Foxcatcher

Character is destiny in this masterfully controlled true-crime sports drama that will likely catapult Steve Carell into the Oscar race. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here