Reviews - Major Releases


Film Review: Bears

Another typically engaging, vividly shot entry in the successful Disney wildlife series.

April 17, 2014

-By Michael Rechtshaffen


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1398278-Bears_Md.jpg
Keenly following the scent of African Cats and Chimpanzees, Disneynature’s Bears combines sweeping vistas and remarkably intimate wildlife photography to typically stirring effect as it documents a year in the life of a mother Alaskan brown bear and her two cubs.

Save for some particularly playful narration provided by John C. Reilly, the film, clocking in at a tidy 77 minutes, adheres closely to the successful blueprint first laid out by 2007’s Earth, pitting a wildlife family unit against the not necessarily nurturing elements.

Released just ahead of Earth Day, Bears could snuggle up handsomely with family audiences looking for some holiday-weekend adventure, although it will have to fight for a share of the turf claimed a week earlier by the exotic birds of Fox’s Rio 2.

To help give it a leg up, during Bears’ opening week Disneynature, via the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, will make a contribution to the National Park Foundation.

Co-directed by Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey, who previously teamed on African Cats, the adventure takes place along the breathtaking Alaskan peninsula, where first-time mom Sky and her two tiny cubs, Amber and Scout, have emerged from hibernation and need to start addressing the food situation.

For a baby bear, getting to that sustenance isn’t exactly a piece of cake, what with avalanches and predatory animals to deal with, including some of their own kind, like Magnus, the dominant alpha-male in their neighborhood, and Chinook, a very hungry outcast who constantly poses a threat to clingy Amber and mischievous Scout.

By now it’s a familiar tale of one family’s survival instinct, but it’s hard not to cuddle up to a cute cub, and all that fearlessly up-close-and-personal footage, set extensively against that untouched Alaskan coastline, nevertheless makes for a compelling excursion.

The inherent drama is boosted by George Fenton’s seriously symphonic score and contrasts with those delightfully loose, animated voiceovers courtesy of Reilly, a big teddy bear of an actor if ever there were one.

-The Hollywood Reporter

Click here for cast & crew information.


Film Review: Bears

Another typically engaging, vividly shot entry in the successful Disney wildlife series.

April 17, 2014

-By Michael Rechtshaffen


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1398278-Bears_Md.jpg

Keenly following the scent of African Cats and Chimpanzees, Disneynature’s Bears combines sweeping vistas and remarkably intimate wildlife photography to typically stirring effect as it documents a year in the life of a mother Alaskan brown bear and her two cubs.

Save for some particularly playful narration provided by John C. Reilly, the film, clocking in at a tidy 77 minutes, adheres closely to the successful blueprint first laid out by 2007’s Earth, pitting a wildlife family unit against the not necessarily nurturing elements.

Released just ahead of Earth Day, Bears could snuggle up handsomely with family audiences looking for some holiday-weekend adventure, although it will have to fight for a share of the turf claimed a week earlier by the exotic birds of Fox’s Rio 2.

To help give it a leg up, during Bears’ opening week Disneynature, via the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, will make a contribution to the National Park Foundation.

Co-directed by Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey, who previously teamed on African Cats, the adventure takes place along the breathtaking Alaskan peninsula, where first-time mom Sky and her two tiny cubs, Amber and Scout, have emerged from hibernation and need to start addressing the food situation.

For a baby bear, getting to that sustenance isn’t exactly a piece of cake, what with avalanches and predatory animals to deal with, including some of their own kind, like Magnus, the dominant alpha-male in their neighborhood, and Chinook, a very hungry outcast who constantly poses a threat to clingy Amber and mischievous Scout.

By now it’s a familiar tale of one family’s survival instinct, but it’s hard not to cuddle up to a cute cub, and all that fearlessly up-close-and-personal footage, set extensively against that untouched Alaskan coastline, nevertheless makes for a compelling excursion.

The inherent drama is boosted by George Fenton’s seriously symphonic score and contrasts with those delightfully loose, animated voiceovers courtesy of Reilly, a big teddy bear of an actor if ever there were one.

-The Hollywood Reporter

Click here for cast & crew information.
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