Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Jackpot

Blood-spattered crime comedy benefits from whip-smart pacing and quirky Scandinavian attitude.

June 25, 2014

-By John DeFore


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1403258-Jackpot_Md.jpg
The kind of quick-witted, high-toned genre flick programs like the Tribeca Film Festival’s Cinemania were made for, Magnus Martens's Jackpot is a black-comic ride once again demonstrating that sudden windfalls of cash aren't all they're cracked up to be. Though likely to attract remake-rights attention, the pic's success with such worn-out tropes would be tough to replicate, especially considering how much entertainment value comes via idiosyncratic performances from its Norwegian cast.

In a twisty, flashback-reliant structure recalling The Usual Suspects, we slowly learn how Oscar (Kyrre Hellum) came to be in police custody as the sole survivor of a massacre in a strip club. The manager of a recycling company that employs ex-cons, he had the misfortune of joining a betting pool with killers, only to win a sum so large nobody would want to share it. But the double-crosses don't arrive predictably, and attempts to hide evidence of each betrayal lead to increasingly outlandish violence.

Director/screenwriter Martens handles the wild implausibilities spinning out from this premise more effectively than the makers of the recent Headhunters, also based on a story by Norwegian crime novelist Jo Nesbo. He moves things along briskly and gets a wry, skeptical performance out of Henrik Mestad (as the detective investigating the murders) that's so off-kilter we don't need Fargo allusions—a gag with the recycling plant's plastic-shredder one-ups that film's wood-chipper scene—to tell us how seriously, or not, to take the action.

The Hollywood Reporter

Click here for cast & crew information.


Film Review: Jackpot

Blood-spattered crime comedy benefits from whip-smart pacing and quirky Scandinavian attitude.

June 25, 2014

-By John DeFore


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1403258-Jackpot_Md.jpg

The kind of quick-witted, high-toned genre flick programs like the Tribeca Film Festival’s Cinemania were made for, Magnus Martens's Jackpot is a black-comic ride once again demonstrating that sudden windfalls of cash aren't all they're cracked up to be. Though likely to attract remake-rights attention, the pic's success with such worn-out tropes would be tough to replicate, especially considering how much entertainment value comes via idiosyncratic performances from its Norwegian cast.

In a twisty, flashback-reliant structure recalling The Usual Suspects, we slowly learn how Oscar (Kyrre Hellum) came to be in police custody as the sole survivor of a massacre in a strip club. The manager of a recycling company that employs ex-cons, he had the misfortune of joining a betting pool with killers, only to win a sum so large nobody would want to share it. But the double-crosses don't arrive predictably, and attempts to hide evidence of each betrayal lead to increasingly outlandish violence.

Director/screenwriter Martens handles the wild implausibilities spinning out from this premise more effectively than the makers of the recent Headhunters, also based on a story by Norwegian crime novelist Jo Nesbo. He moves things along briskly and gets a wry, skeptical performance out of Henrik Mestad (as the detective investigating the murders) that's so off-kilter we don't need Fargo allusions—a gag with the recycling plant's plastic-shredder one-ups that film's wood-chipper scene—to tell us how seriously, or not, to take the action.

The Hollywood Reporter

Click here for cast & crew information.
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