Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Supporting Characters

Filmmaking is just another workplace (in a good way) in Daniel Schechter's relationship comedy.

Jan 23, 2013

-By John DeFore


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1370778-Supporting_Characters_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

A behind-the-scenes relationship film with refreshingly little interest in mythologizing or caricaturing the film biz its protagonists inhabit, Daniel Schechter's Supporting Characters earns a steady stream of laughs while taking its questions about grown-up romance seriously. It should be well-liked at art houses, earning an additional boost via star Alex Karpovsky, whose work with Lena Dunham (she has a cameo here) will raise the picture's profile with “Girls” fans.

Karpovsky plays Nick, a freelance movie editor who, with partner Daryl (Tarik Lowe, who co-wrote the film with Schechter), is trying to fix a troubled indie comedy whose director (Kevin Corrigan) has gone AWOL. Corrigan, predictably and enjoyably, delivers the color in this scenario—grumbling about perceived threats to his integrity but generally being a funny flake—while Nick and Daryl alternate between funny, realistic workplace banter and love-life debriefs.

Nick has a comfy relationship with fiancée Amy (Sophia Takal), while Daryl navigates choppy waters with Liana (Melonie Diaz). But when the lead actress on their film (Arielle Kebbel's Jamie) starts flirting with Nick during an ADR session, he begins trying to rationalize a possible fling with a movie star. Soon enough, Corrigan's loose-screw auteur isn't the only deluded male in the picture.

If the film's tech values lean toward those of a modest TV production, the script's fine-tuned comic beats and the easy chemistry of the ensemble more than compensate. Karpovsky, offering a drastic contrast with his other Tribeca 2012 entrant (Rubberneck, which he also directed), is showcased, but co-stars, especially Takal, make their mark with much less screen time.
The Hollywood Reporter


Film Review: Supporting Characters

Filmmaking is just another workplace (in a good way) in Daniel Schechter's relationship comedy.

Jan 23, 2013

-By John DeFore


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1370778-Supporting_Characters_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

A behind-the-scenes relationship film with refreshingly little interest in mythologizing or caricaturing the film biz its protagonists inhabit, Daniel Schechter's Supporting Characters earns a steady stream of laughs while taking its questions about grown-up romance seriously. It should be well-liked at art houses, earning an additional boost via star Alex Karpovsky, whose work with Lena Dunham (she has a cameo here) will raise the picture's profile with “Girls” fans.

Karpovsky plays Nick, a freelance movie editor who, with partner Daryl (Tarik Lowe, who co-wrote the film with Schechter), is trying to fix a troubled indie comedy whose director (Kevin Corrigan) has gone AWOL. Corrigan, predictably and enjoyably, delivers the color in this scenario—grumbling about perceived threats to his integrity but generally being a funny flake—while Nick and Daryl alternate between funny, realistic workplace banter and love-life debriefs.

Nick has a comfy relationship with fiancée Amy (Sophia Takal), while Daryl navigates choppy waters with Liana (Melonie Diaz). But when the lead actress on their film (Arielle Kebbel's Jamie) starts flirting with Nick during an ADR session, he begins trying to rationalize a possible fling with a movie star. Soon enough, Corrigan's loose-screw auteur isn't the only deluded male in the picture.

If the film's tech values lean toward those of a modest TV production, the script's fine-tuned comic beats and the easy chemistry of the ensemble more than compensate. Karpovsky, offering a drastic contrast with his other Tribeca 2012 entrant (Rubberneck, which he also directed), is showcased, but co-stars, especially Takal, make their mark with much less screen time.
The Hollywood Reporter
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

PK
Film Review: PK

An alien trying to return home tangles with religious authorities in a low-key Bollywood message drama. More »

A Small Section
Film Review: A Small Section of the World

Worthy but uninvolving documentary about the coffee-producing women of Costa Rica. More »

Sagrada
Film Review: Sagrada: The Mystery of Creation

The fabulous 130-year work-in-progress that is Barcelona's Sagrada Familia cathedral, as well as its crazy-brilliant originator, Antonio Gaudi, is the focus of this vividly informative documentary. More »

Inside the Mind of Leonardo
Film Review: Inside the Mind of Leonardo in 3D

Documentary-feature hybrid that offers unexpected insight into the world of Leonardo da Vinci, but nonetheless suffers from a heavy hand and pretentious sensibility. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Into the Woods
Film Review: Into the Woods

Over-scaled, too dark and only intermittently charming Sondheim musical adaptation does a disservice to a great cast and is often so noisy you can't even appreciate the music. More »

The H obbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Film Review: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

After rewriting the rules for modern fantasy cinema, for the better and worse, Peter Jackson’s six-film Tolkien saga slams, bangs and shudders to a long-overdue conclusion. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here