Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Loosies

“Loosies” are what you call single cigarettes you can buy in New York bodegas, and that is about all you’ll really learn from this strenuously rambunctious effort.

Jan 5, 2012

-By David Noh


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1302108-Loosies_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

To pay off his dead father’s gambling debts, Bobby (Peter Facinelli) finds himself in indentured servitude to Jax (Vincent Gallo), a hotheaded loan shark, and forced to become a pickpocket/petty thief. Along with his regular, brutal encounters with Jax, Bobby also has the law after him, for stealing the badge of Police Lieutenant Sully (Michael Madsen). As if his life weren’t fraught enough, a recent one-night stand with Lucy (Jaimie Alexander) has resulted in her pregnancy for this decidedly most un-paternal of dudes.

Facinelli produced and wrote the screenplay for Loosies, which, like so many other actor-induced vehicles (Brando’s self-directed One-Eyed Jacks being a prime example), has many scenes of him being beaten up, by Jax’s henchmen or Lucy’s bartender. Call it a kind of star-entitled martyrdom meant to guarantee audience empathy. Unfortunately, the film is such a random, cacophonous mess that the primary emotion evoked is stupefication. Although he starts off with a slickly clever montage of Bobby’s pickpocket techniques, director Michael Corrente tries to jab some jittery life into this with frenetic pacing and encouraging his actors to cartoonish extremes, but the characters, when not completely off-putting, are just uninteresting.

I’ve enjoyed Facinelli in Can’t Hardly Wait and “Nurse Jackie,” where he evinced an amusing egomaniacal comic flair, but he seems more of a character guy than a true lead, lacking the charismatic weight which could turn this movie into a fun, dark-edged romp. Alexander is pretty and shows some strength as Lucy, but what she’s given to do is shoddy stuff. Marianne Leone as Rita, Bobby’s mother, acts with a mistimed intensity that doesn’t quite match up to the rest of the performances. As her love interest, a savvy jeweler named Carl, to whom Bobby takes an instant aversion, Joe Pantoliano gives a measured performance that is the film’s best, but also somehow seems out of place. Madsen has little to do but huff and grump, along with his police superior, a very wasted William Forsythe. As for Gallo, guess what? He’s weird and manic and out-of control: quel stretch.



Film Review: Loosies

“Loosies” are what you call single cigarettes you can buy in New York bodegas, and that is about all you’ll really learn from this strenuously rambunctious effort.

Jan 5, 2012

-By David Noh


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1302108-Loosies_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

To pay off his dead father’s gambling debts, Bobby (Peter Facinelli) finds himself in indentured servitude to Jax (Vincent Gallo), a hotheaded loan shark, and forced to become a pickpocket/petty thief. Along with his regular, brutal encounters with Jax, Bobby also has the law after him, for stealing the badge of Police Lieutenant Sully (Michael Madsen). As if his life weren’t fraught enough, a recent one-night stand with Lucy (Jaimie Alexander) has resulted in her pregnancy for this decidedly most un-paternal of dudes.

Facinelli produced and wrote the screenplay for Loosies, which, like so many other actor-induced vehicles (Brando’s self-directed One-Eyed Jacks being a prime example), has many scenes of him being beaten up, by Jax’s henchmen or Lucy’s bartender. Call it a kind of star-entitled martyrdom meant to guarantee audience empathy. Unfortunately, the film is such a random, cacophonous mess that the primary emotion evoked is stupefication. Although he starts off with a slickly clever montage of Bobby’s pickpocket techniques, director Michael Corrente tries to jab some jittery life into this with frenetic pacing and encouraging his actors to cartoonish extremes, but the characters, when not completely off-putting, are just uninteresting.

I’ve enjoyed Facinelli in Can’t Hardly Wait and “Nurse Jackie,” where he evinced an amusing egomaniacal comic flair, but he seems more of a character guy than a true lead, lacking the charismatic weight which could turn this movie into a fun, dark-edged romp. Alexander is pretty and shows some strength as Lucy, but what she’s given to do is shoddy stuff. Marianne Leone as Rita, Bobby’s mother, acts with a mistimed intensity that doesn’t quite match up to the rest of the performances. As her love interest, a savvy jeweler named Carl, to whom Bobby takes an instant aversion, Joe Pantoliano gives a measured performance that is the film’s best, but also somehow seems out of place. Madsen has little to do but huff and grump, along with his police superior, a very wasted William Forsythe. As for Gallo, guess what? He’s weird and manic and out-of control: quel stretch.
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

Small Time
Film Review: Small Time

You might not buy a used car from the guys in Small Time, but you will enjoy the movie about their exploits, even their exploitations (of others). More »

Fading Gigolo
Film Review: Fading Gigolo

Some top screen talent gets lost in the silliness surrounding the amorous adventures of an unlikely gigolo and his even more unlikely pimp, with writer/director/actor John Turturro the shtupper “ho” co-starring with Woody Allen as the mercenary shtup-enabler. Yarmulkes off to Turturro’s brave but deeply ill-conceived comedic foray into Brooklyn’s Satmar Hasidic community and other alien territory. More »

A Promise
Film Review: A Promise

Handsomely filmed but wan period romance. More »

Final Member
Film Review: The Final Member

Breezy documentary about the aging owner of a small Icelandic museum dedicated to penises and his quest for one last, coveted exhibit is a charmer, thanks to the warmth and sly sense of humor the protagonist brings to his unusual hobby. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Transcendence
Film Review: Transcendence

Johnny Depp is an idealistic researcher whose consciousness is uploaded into an artificial intelligence in this slick techno-thriller with delusions of seriousness from Christopher Nolan’s cinematographer. More »

Draft Day
Film Review: Draft Day

Pro football manager faces crises on the most important day of his career in a well-tooled vehicle for Kevin Costner. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here