Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Least Among Saints

This entry in the returning-vet genre should probably have gone straight to the Lifetime channel.

Oct 12, 2012

-By David Noh


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1365008-Least_Saints_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Gulf War veteran Anthony (Martin Papazian) comes home to Tucson, Arizona, severely affected with PTSD, with its attendant nightmares, flashbacks and trauma. He hits the bottle and terrorizes the neighborhood, estranging his ex-wife (Audrey Marie Anderson), who takes out a restraining order against him. He crashes his car, but a form of redemption offers itself when his neighbor (A.J. Cook), a prostitute, OD’s, and Anthony takes her little son Wade (Tristan Lake Leabu, excellent) under his wing, saving him from the horrors of foster care. The question of his being, with all of his baggage, perhaps not the best alternative are eventually brushed away by a social worker with the unfortunately evocative name of Jolene (a nicely strong Laura San Giacomo).

Here we go with another male triple-threat attempt at acting, directing and writing on the part of Papazian. It should be said that he’s definitely best as an actor, possessing dark good looks and a quiet power. But Papazian’s writing and direction of Least Among Saints are none too original, smacking of many another soap opera-ish vet-coming-home tale. The acting is good overall, however, and Anthony’s initial scenes with Wade are affectingly authentic. It is only later, when they set out on a road trip to find Wade’s father, followed by an overwrought wind-up, that your patience is pushed to the limit. Preachiness also rears its dreary head here in the form of a sympathetic police chief (Charles S. Dutton), filling the audience in on the need for compassion for this ruined soldier.



Film Review: Least Among Saints

This entry in the returning-vet genre should probably have gone straight to the Lifetime channel.

Oct 12, 2012

-By David Noh


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1365008-Least_Saints_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Gulf War veteran Anthony (Martin Papazian) comes home to Tucson, Arizona, severely affected with PTSD, with its attendant nightmares, flashbacks and trauma. He hits the bottle and terrorizes the neighborhood, estranging his ex-wife (Audrey Marie Anderson), who takes out a restraining order against him. He crashes his car, but a form of redemption offers itself when his neighbor (A.J. Cook), a prostitute, OD’s, and Anthony takes her little son Wade (Tristan Lake Leabu, excellent) under his wing, saving him from the horrors of foster care. The question of his being, with all of his baggage, perhaps not the best alternative are eventually brushed away by a social worker with the unfortunately evocative name of Jolene (a nicely strong Laura San Giacomo).

Here we go with another male triple-threat attempt at acting, directing and writing on the part of Papazian. It should be said that he’s definitely best as an actor, possessing dark good looks and a quiet power. But Papazian’s writing and direction of Least Among Saints are none too original, smacking of many another soap opera-ish vet-coming-home tale. The acting is good overall, however, and Anthony’s initial scenes with Wade are affectingly authentic. It is only later, when they set out on a road trip to find Wade’s father, followed by an overwrought wind-up, that your patience is pushed to the limit. Preachiness also rears its dreary head here in the form of a sympathetic police chief (Charles S. Dutton), filling the audience in on the need for compassion for this ruined soldier.
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

PK
Film Review: PK

An alien trying to return home tangles with religious authorities in a low-key Bollywood message drama. More »

A Small Section
Film Review: A Small Section of the World

Worthy but uninvolving documentary about the coffee-producing women of Costa Rica. More »

Sagrada
Film Review: Sagrada: The Mystery of Creation

The fabulous 130-year work-in-progress that is Barcelona's Sagrada Familia cathedral, as well as its crazy-brilliant originator, Antonio Gaudi, is the focus of this vividly informative documentary. More »

Inside the Mind of Leonardo
Film Review: Inside the Mind of Leonardo in 3D

Documentary-feature hybrid that offers unexpected insight into the world of Leonardo da Vinci, but nonetheless suffers from a heavy hand and pretentious sensibility. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Into the Woods
Film Review: Into the Woods

Over-scaled, too dark and only intermittently charming Sondheim musical adaptation does a disservice to a great cast and is often so noisy you can't even appreciate the music. More »

The H obbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Film Review: The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

After rewriting the rules for modern fantasy cinema, for the better and worse, Peter Jackson’s six-film Tolkien saga slams, bangs and shudders to a long-overdue conclusion. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here