Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: The Retrieval

A skillfully wrought feature with appreciable emotional and historical resonance.

April 1, 2014

-By Justin Lowe


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1397298-Retrieval_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Leveraging limited resources to impressive effect, writer-director Chris Eska’s empathetic scripting and well-tuned casting reliably guide The Retrieval’s memorable trajectory.

Set in 1864 in the midst of the Civil War, the film centers on young teenage Will (Ashton Sanders), who along with his uncle Marcus (Keston John) works for a gang of bounty hunters led by Burrell (Bill Oberst, Jr.), recapturing runaway slaves and tracking down wanted criminals. Without family after his mother’s death and father’s disappearance on a trip to the north, Will is subjected to harsh treatment and frequent exploitation by Marcus, a man in his 30s who’s apparently seen more than his share of trouble.

Unable to safely cross Union lines, Burrell sends Marcus and Will on a mission with the promise of a sizeable payout if they bring back freed slave and fugitive murderer Nate (Tishuan Scott, in a standout performance), who’s working for Federal troops digging graves for dead soldiers. After trekking northward for several days, Marcus and Will locate Nate in a Union encampment, persuading him to follow them back to his hometown with a story about his dying brother requesting a visit.

Their journey is beset with peril at nearly every juncture, and after Marcus gets killed in the crossfire of a Confederate-Union skirmish, Will continues south with Nate, struggling to keep his secret as he grows to view the older man as a father figure, knowing that Burrell would gladly kill Nate for the bounty if he comes within rifle range.

Shooting almost exclusively outdoors in his native Texas with only the occasional rough-hewn structure and a single battle scene to lend period authenticity, Eska skillfully reallocates resources to manage the frequently complex sequences tracking the characters through a series of inhospitably autumnal landscapes. The small cast allows the filmmakers to minimize distractions and concentrate primarily on character drama, as Will gradually withdraws from Marcus’ abusive influence, drawn in by Nate’s austere, survival-oriented integrity.

As much a coming-of-age experience for Will as it is a coming-to-terms for Nate, Eska leverages these dual themes to resolve the film’s central conflict. Appearing in his first feature, the teenage Sanders portrays Will’s internal struggles with perceptive empathy, but once Nate enters the narrative, it’s Scott’s movie.

Delving into the character with a desperate fervor, Scott’s multifaceted performance incrementally reveals Nate’s emotional torment and yearning for some semblance of redemption. Supporting cast members are finely etched in briefer scenes impelling Will and Nate toward their ultimate confrontation with Burrell.

With a few labored metaphors and some superficial, coincidental similarities to Django Unchained aside, Eska has crafted an eloquently insightful narrative distilling the less recognized conflicts of the Civil War into an intense historical drama. Cinematographer Yasu Tanida’s capably captured visuals and counterintuitive musical compositions by Matt Wiedemann and Jon Attwood put a keen edge on Eska’s distinctive filmmaking.

-The Hollywood Reporter


Film Review: The Retrieval

A skillfully wrought feature with appreciable emotional and historical resonance.

April 1, 2014

-By Justin Lowe


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1397298-Retrieval_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Leveraging limited resources to impressive effect, writer-director Chris Eska’s empathetic scripting and well-tuned casting reliably guide The Retrieval’s memorable trajectory.

Set in 1864 in the midst of the Civil War, the film centers on young teenage Will (Ashton Sanders), who along with his uncle Marcus (Keston John) works for a gang of bounty hunters led by Burrell (Bill Oberst, Jr.), recapturing runaway slaves and tracking down wanted criminals. Without family after his mother’s death and father’s disappearance on a trip to the north, Will is subjected to harsh treatment and frequent exploitation by Marcus, a man in his 30s who’s apparently seen more than his share of trouble.

Unable to safely cross Union lines, Burrell sends Marcus and Will on a mission with the promise of a sizeable payout if they bring back freed slave and fugitive murderer Nate (Tishuan Scott, in a standout performance), who’s working for Federal troops digging graves for dead soldiers. After trekking northward for several days, Marcus and Will locate Nate in a Union encampment, persuading him to follow them back to his hometown with a story about his dying brother requesting a visit.

Their journey is beset with peril at nearly every juncture, and after Marcus gets killed in the crossfire of a Confederate-Union skirmish, Will continues south with Nate, struggling to keep his secret as he grows to view the older man as a father figure, knowing that Burrell would gladly kill Nate for the bounty if he comes within rifle range.

Shooting almost exclusively outdoors in his native Texas with only the occasional rough-hewn structure and a single battle scene to lend period authenticity, Eska skillfully reallocates resources to manage the frequently complex sequences tracking the characters through a series of inhospitably autumnal landscapes. The small cast allows the filmmakers to minimize distractions and concentrate primarily on character drama, as Will gradually withdraws from Marcus’ abusive influence, drawn in by Nate’s austere, survival-oriented integrity.

As much a coming-of-age experience for Will as it is a coming-to-terms for Nate, Eska leverages these dual themes to resolve the film’s central conflict. Appearing in his first feature, the teenage Sanders portrays Will’s internal struggles with perceptive empathy, but once Nate enters the narrative, it’s Scott’s movie.

Delving into the character with a desperate fervor, Scott’s multifaceted performance incrementally reveals Nate’s emotional torment and yearning for some semblance of redemption. Supporting cast members are finely etched in briefer scenes impelling Will and Nate toward their ultimate confrontation with Burrell.

With a few labored metaphors and some superficial, coincidental similarities to Django Unchained aside, Eska has crafted an eloquently insightful narrative distilling the less recognized conflicts of the Civil War into an intense historical drama. Cinematographer Yasu Tanida’s capably captured visuals and counterintuitive musical compositions by Matt Wiedemann and Jon Attwood put a keen edge on Eska’s distinctive filmmaking.

-The Hollywood Reporter
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