Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: The Golden Boys

Picturesque if plodding indie romantic comedy about three salty dogs in 1905 Cape Cod who bring in a would-be bride to keep house.

April 16, 2009

-By Frank Lovece


filmjournal/photos/stylus/79474-Golden_Boys_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

David Carradine and Charles Durning steal the spotlight with a quietly powerful and a loudly powerful performance, respectively, in this Massachusetts-made independent film shot under the working title Chatham. They're not enough to make the period romantic comedy The Golden Boys breezy or engrossing, but they give this low-key, grownup effort some interesting moments. Whether those moments add up to make a movie depends on one's tolerance for a trio of old salty dogs spouting things like "Tarnation" and "Landssakes."

In Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1905, retired sea captains Zeb Hedge (Carradine), Jerry Burgess (Rip Torn) and Perez Ryder (Bruce Dern) are finding that their plan to share a nice house and modest means is running into the snag that, whether 1905 or 2005, guys are slobs. With all the characterization and depth of sketch-comedy players, they quickly decide that one of them must find a wife, get married, and take the other two in as borders. Using the period equivalent of Craigslist—a newspaper catering to lonely-hearts ads—they get sensible widow Martha Snow (Mariel Hemingway) to give them a try. Sub-Neil-Simon wackiness ensues, at a pace that's not exactly a nor'easter of comedy or romance.

A subplot with little suspense has an anti-alcohol firebrand (Durning) getting medieval on the tavern of the local rum merchant (John Savage). This seems odd, given that rum was a necessary provision on most ships, serving as both a sanitary drink and an analgesic for sore seaman, but writer-director Daniel Adams' story was "inspired by" a novel by an actual old sea captain of the era, the popular writer Joseph C. Lincoln.

Cape Cod resident Julie Harris has a dialogue-free role playing the melodeon in one scene, which is enough to net her a "special appearance by" credit.


Film Review: The Golden Boys

Picturesque if plodding indie romantic comedy about three salty dogs in 1905 Cape Cod who bring in a would-be bride to keep house.

April 16, 2009

-By Frank Lovece


filmjournal/photos/stylus/79474-Golden_Boys_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

David Carradine and Charles Durning steal the spotlight with a quietly powerful and a loudly powerful performance, respectively, in this Massachusetts-made independent film shot under the working title Chatham. They're not enough to make the period romantic comedy The Golden Boys breezy or engrossing, but they give this low-key, grownup effort some interesting moments. Whether those moments add up to make a movie depends on one's tolerance for a trio of old salty dogs spouting things like "Tarnation" and "Landssakes."

In Cape Cod, Massachusetts in 1905, retired sea captains Zeb Hedge (Carradine), Jerry Burgess (Rip Torn) and Perez Ryder (Bruce Dern) are finding that their plan to share a nice house and modest means is running into the snag that, whether 1905 or 2005, guys are slobs. With all the characterization and depth of sketch-comedy players, they quickly decide that one of them must find a wife, get married, and take the other two in as borders. Using the period equivalent of Craigslist—a newspaper catering to lonely-hearts ads—they get sensible widow Martha Snow (Mariel Hemingway) to give them a try. Sub-Neil-Simon wackiness ensues, at a pace that's not exactly a nor'easter of comedy or romance.

A subplot with little suspense has an anti-alcohol firebrand (Durning) getting medieval on the tavern of the local rum merchant (John Savage). This seems odd, given that rum was a necessary provision on most ships, serving as both a sanitary drink and an analgesic for sore seaman, but writer-director Daniel Adams' story was "inspired by" a novel by an actual old sea captain of the era, the popular writer Joseph C. Lincoln.

Cape Cod resident Julie Harris has a dialogue-free role playing the melodeon in one scene, which is enough to net her a "special appearance by" credit.
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

Happy Christmas
Film Review: Happy Christmas

Joe Swanberg's latest feature is a collection of strong individual scenes and performances that never quite finds its statement of purpose. More »

Very Good Girls
Film Review: Very Good Girls

More of a meandering, misguided path than a road to hell, Naomi Foner’s directing debut, starring Dakota Fanning and Elizabeth Olsen as 18-year-old BFFs, is similarly filled with good intentions. More »

The Kill Team
Film Review: The Kill Team

Marine Adam Winfield goes on trial in a case in which U.S. soldiers murdered innocent Afghanis. Strong subject marred by poor narrative choices. More »

The Divine Move
Film Review: The Divine Move

Excessive violence and off-the-wall plotting undermine an intriguing game-based premise. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Guardians of the Galaxy review
Film Review: Guardians of the Galaxy

With Marvel’s backing, cult filmmaker James Gunn blasts off for the stars and takes audiences along for a wild, funny ride. More »

Hercules
Film Review: Hercules

Legendary strongman is caught in the middle of a brutal civil war in a fast-paced vehicle for Dwayne Johnson. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here