Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Multiple Sarcasms

So-so, light tale of a successful New York architect who endangers his comfortable, conventional life to navel-gaze and write a play provides some moments for the always watchable Timothy Hutton. But there’s not much else to watch.

May 7, 2010

-By Doris Toumarkine


filmjournal/photos/stylus/138154-Multiple_Sarcasms_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Woody Allen has occasionally proven that extreme self-involvement and disruptive existential angst can amuse, but the comedy-drama Multiple Sarcasms, with a well-heeled but tormented Manhattan hero who grates as a spoiled malcontent, misses the mark. Even filmgoers who enjoy the vaguely sophisticated urban worlds of Allen, Nicole Holofcener and Noah Baumbach, among others, are unlikely to take the subway to this one.

It’s 1979 for some reason and Manhattan architect and family man Gabriel is losing it. It’s not just his mental balance that teeters but maybe even his job. As he sinks into a contemplation of his life and a compulsion to transmogrify this examination into a play, even the stability of his family is at risk.

Self-destruction is the stuff of tragedy but needs help in being satisfyingly comedic. Luckily for Gabriel (and for viewers), he has an understanding and schmoozy wife in Annie (Dana Delany). And there’s Elizabeth (India Ennenga), the proverbial precocious daughter who slips into obnoxiousness at the drop of a line. Gabriel also counts on longtime good buddy Cari (Mira Sorvino) and positively needs his almost-coddling agent Pamela (Stockard Channing), who believes this novice just might have what it takes.

Symptoms of Gabriel’s malaise increase and he loses his job. Indulgent if not indigent, he ducks into too many movies, runs off to the country for solitude, pours his grief out to bisexual friend Rocky (Mario Van Peebles), and spends too much time with Cari, jeopardizing his marriage.

But the guy can write, and write he does through so much sturm und drang. Gabriel’s play Multiple Sarcasms finally gets produced and the happy endings don’t end there.

At least Hutton has a role to chew on here and the supporting cast is amiable enough. And assuring that filmgoers know the world they’ve gotten themselves into, even downtown art house Cinema Village gets a cameo.


Film Review: Multiple Sarcasms

So-so, light tale of a successful New York architect who endangers his comfortable, conventional life to navel-gaze and write a play provides some moments for the always watchable Timothy Hutton. But there’s not much else to watch.

May 7, 2010

-By Doris Toumarkine


filmjournal/photos/stylus/138154-Multiple_Sarcasms_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Woody Allen has occasionally proven that extreme self-involvement and disruptive existential angst can amuse, but the comedy-drama Multiple Sarcasms, with a well-heeled but tormented Manhattan hero who grates as a spoiled malcontent, misses the mark. Even filmgoers who enjoy the vaguely sophisticated urban worlds of Allen, Nicole Holofcener and Noah Baumbach, among others, are unlikely to take the subway to this one.

It’s 1979 for some reason and Manhattan architect and family man Gabriel is losing it. It’s not just his mental balance that teeters but maybe even his job. As he sinks into a contemplation of his life and a compulsion to transmogrify this examination into a play, even the stability of his family is at risk.

Self-destruction is the stuff of tragedy but needs help in being satisfyingly comedic. Luckily for Gabriel (and for viewers), he has an understanding and schmoozy wife in Annie (Dana Delany). And there’s Elizabeth (India Ennenga), the proverbial precocious daughter who slips into obnoxiousness at the drop of a line. Gabriel also counts on longtime good buddy Cari (Mira Sorvino) and positively needs his almost-coddling agent Pamela (Stockard Channing), who believes this novice just might have what it takes.

Symptoms of Gabriel’s malaise increase and he loses his job. Indulgent if not indigent, he ducks into too many movies, runs off to the country for solitude, pours his grief out to bisexual friend Rocky (Mario Van Peebles), and spends too much time with Cari, jeopardizing his marriage.

But the guy can write, and write he does through so much sturm und drang. Gabriel’s play Multiple Sarcasms finally gets produced and the happy endings don’t end there.

At least Hutton has a role to chew on here and the supporting cast is amiable enough. And assuring that filmgoers know the world they’ve gotten themselves into, even downtown art house Cinema Village gets a cameo.
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

Time is Illmatic
Film Review: Nas: Time is Illmatic

Intended as the portrait of an artist as a young man, the music doc Time Is Illmatic is actually more interesting as a look back at the place and time that created him. More »

The Decent One
Film Review: The Decent One

A behind-the-scenes portrait of one of the Nazi regime’s most fearsome executioners. More »

The Two Faces of January
Film Review: The Two Faces of January

Good pulp yarn about three disparate Americans—an aging con man, his lovely young wife, and an impetuous tour guide—who meet their destiny among the ancient ruins of Greece. More »

Tazza 2: The Hidden Card
Film Review: Tazza 2: The Hidden Card

Wildly entertaining and kaleidoscopic, this sequel to a Korean hit is strictly aces. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

The Equalizer Review
Film Review: The Equalizer

Former agent is drawn out of hiding to fight a Russian gang in a reboot of the 1980s television series. More »

The Boxtrolls
Film Review: The Boxtrolls

Another amazingly meticulous and stylish stop-motion tale from the Laika studio, this time focusing on a boy adopted by a population of maligned underground trolls. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here