Reviews - Specialty Releases


Film Review: Hatchet III

This horror sequel delivers the explicitly bloody mayhem genre fans crave.

June 13, 2013

-By Frank Scheck


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1379338-Hatchet3_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Hatchet III begins immediately after its 2010 predecessor left off, and that’s not the only feeling of déjà vu permeating this third installment in the cheesy trilogy recalling ’80s-era horror films. Once again depicting the murderous exploits of the swamp-haunting Victor Crowley (Kane Hodder), the film offers gore hounds generous doses of the bloodily explicit mayhem they’ve come to expect.

Creator Adam Green has handed over the directorial reins to B.J. McDonnell, a former camera operator on the previous films, but little differs in the way of its aesthetics. The execution, however, leaves something to be desired, as this effort seems more visually muddled and choppier than previous installments.

The opening sequence features heroine Marybeth (Danielle Harris) blowing Crowley away with a shotgun, but every horror film aficionado knows that hardly means anything. Indeed, the hulking monster is soon back to wreak more violent mayhem, a situation conveniently explained by the revelation that he’s a “repeater,” or spectral figure with the ability to return to life night after night in physically unaltered form.

Among the other characters figuring in the simplistic storyline—which basically involves the local cops racing to the scene of the crime only to get dispatched one-by-one in bloody fashion—are a local cop (Zach Galligan) and his journalist ex-wife (Caroline Williams) who claims to have figured out a way to get rid of Victor permanently. It’s not hard to guess that—should Hatchet III prove successful enough on DVD—her scheme will be proven ineffective.

The fast-paced film certainly features enough dismemberments, disembowelments, shootings, stabbings, etc. to please genre fans, even if the special effects employed often prove less than convincing.

Hodder, who also holds the dubious distinction of having played Jason Voorhees in no fewer than four Friday the 13th films, remains a suitably forbidding figure. As usual, the casting provides nods to aficionados: Besides the presence of Galligan (Gremlins), Williams (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2) and Derek Mears (yet another Jason Voorhees, in the 2009 reboot) in leading roles, there are also cameos by genre veteran Sid Haig and Green himself.
The Hollywood Reporter



Film Review: Hatchet III

This horror sequel delivers the explicitly bloody mayhem genre fans crave.

June 13, 2013

-By Frank Scheck


filmjournal/photos/stylus/1379338-Hatchet3_Md.jpg

For movie details, please click here.

Hatchet III begins immediately after its 2010 predecessor left off, and that’s not the only feeling of déjà vu permeating this third installment in the cheesy trilogy recalling ’80s-era horror films. Once again depicting the murderous exploits of the swamp-haunting Victor Crowley (Kane Hodder), the film offers gore hounds generous doses of the bloodily explicit mayhem they’ve come to expect.

Creator Adam Green has handed over the directorial reins to B.J. McDonnell, a former camera operator on the previous films, but little differs in the way of its aesthetics. The execution, however, leaves something to be desired, as this effort seems more visually muddled and choppier than previous installments.

The opening sequence features heroine Marybeth (Danielle Harris) blowing Crowley away with a shotgun, but every horror film aficionado knows that hardly means anything. Indeed, the hulking monster is soon back to wreak more violent mayhem, a situation conveniently explained by the revelation that he’s a “repeater,” or spectral figure with the ability to return to life night after night in physically unaltered form.

Among the other characters figuring in the simplistic storyline—which basically involves the local cops racing to the scene of the crime only to get dispatched one-by-one in bloody fashion—are a local cop (Zach Galligan) and his journalist ex-wife (Caroline Williams) who claims to have figured out a way to get rid of Victor permanently. It’s not hard to guess that—should Hatchet III prove successful enough on DVD—her scheme will be proven ineffective.

The fast-paced film certainly features enough dismemberments, disembowelments, shootings, stabbings, etc. to please genre fans, even if the special effects employed often prove less than convincing.

Hodder, who also holds the dubious distinction of having played Jason Voorhees in no fewer than four Friday the 13th films, remains a suitably forbidding figure. As usual, the casting provides nods to aficionados: Besides the presence of Galligan (Gremlins), Williams (Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2) and Derek Mears (yet another Jason Voorhees, in the 2009 reboot) in leading roles, there are also cameos by genre veteran Sid Haig and Green himself.
The Hollywood Reporter
Post a Comment
Asterisk (*) is a required field.
* Author: 
Rate This Article: (1=Bad, 5=Perfect)

*Comment:
 

More Specialty Releases

The Congress
Film Review: The Congress

Part live-action, part cornea-searing animation, this cinematic overload is ambitious but ultimately fatigues as it plays with the intriguing notion of a fading Hollywood star selling rights so her cyberspace avatar can rise to superstardom and stay forever young in virtual reality. Flashy animation and cynical stabs at celebrity culture and movie-studio finagling keep things lively for a while. More »

The Last of Robin Hood
Film Review: The Last of Robin Hood

Serviceable vehicle for a salacious story. More »

Last Weekend
Film Review: Last Weekend

A sort of modern Chekhovian study of family tensions over a country weekend, this indie drama is very pretty to look at and at times disarming, but needed more punch. More »

The Notebook
Film Review: The Notebook

An aloof adaptation of Agota Kristof's best-seller that's technically impressive but precludes audience identification. More »

ADVERTISEMENT



REVIEWS

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For
Film Review: Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

Neither significantly better nor worse than its predecessor, the belated Sin City sequel is more of a repeat, rather than a continuation, of the original. More »

If I Stay
Film Review: If I Stay

Delivers as promised. More »

Player for the Film Journal International website.


ADVERTISEMENT



INDUSTRY GUIDES

» Blue Sheets
FJI's guide to upcoming movie releases, including films in production and development. Check back weekly for the latest additions.

» Distribution Guide
» Equipment Guide
» Exhibition Guide

ORDER A PRINT SUBSCRIPTION

Film Journal International

Subscribe to the monthly print edition of Film Journal International and get the full visual impact of this valuable resource for the cinema business.

» Click Here

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Learn how to promote your company at the Film Expo Group events: ShowEast, CineEurope, and CineAsia.

» Click Here