FAT GIRLS

R
Reviews

No gay-indie cliché is avoided in Fat Girls, an abysmal little conceit wholly lacking in originality, wit or technical style. Gay Broadway aspirant Rodney Miller (Ash Christian) is stuck in an uninspiring Texas town and feels himself to be a “fat girl”—i.e., a total loser with zero self-esteem. (Weight-challenged females can hereby join the long line of the disgruntled by this equal-opportunity cinematic offender.) Naturally, high school senior Rodney has a rotund best gal pal, Sabrina (Ashley Fink), as no gay coming-of-age story is complete without this type, as essential to the genre as bimbotic blondes are to slasher movies.

Sabrina, who lives with lesbian parents in a trailer, manages to find love with a Cuban chubby-chaser classmate, Rudy (Robin De Jesus), while Rodney has his own romantic challenges presented by Joey (Joe Flaten), a smooth Brit boy who jaw-droppingly agrees to be his date to the senior prom. Joey takes him to his first gay bar, where—surprise!—Rodney’s favorite teacher (Jonathan Caouette) is spotted performing (badly) in drag. Rodney’s home life is pretty weird, too, with a devoutly Christian mother (Deborah Theaker) whipping up delicacies in the kitchen like "Jesus Jambalaya." (This heavy-handed word play is rife in the movie, with characters living on “Leviticus Lane” and that drag-lovin’ teacher’s name, “Seymour Cox.”)

You watch this farrago with a heavy heart—and heavier eyelids—as Sabrina gets stuck in a Volkswagen Beetle during a heavy petting session with Rudy. (I thought gay auteurs were supposed to be sensitive.) Writer/director/star Christian was 20 when he made this movie, which one supposes accounts for its sad derivativeness and ultimately jejune quality approaching absolute deadliness. He narrates the film, in a tone of such overbearing sarcasm that it sucks out whatever possible life or real poignancy these quirky goings-on may have had. Hopefully, he will experience a lot more in life—and see other movies besides every gay coming-out story made in the last 15 years—and perhaps one day make a film worth watching.